Lillian Winsberg ca 1894TRICYCLE DREAMS

Ancestry,  March-April 2010
For children of all ages who have ever loved – or yearned for -  a tricycle comes a grandmother’s century-old remembrance of a heart’s desire unfulfilled.

Download the PDF from Ancestry magazine’s final print issue.


THE REPORT OF MY DEATH WAS AN EXAGGERATION

Ancestry, September-October 2009
Obituaries can open doors for any family historian. You can find dates, names, relationships, and residences. But what do you do with the obituary that was written before a person’s death? Download PDF from Ancestry Magazine

A TOMBSTONE TELLS ITS STORY

Ancestry, July-August 2009
My story about the 1893 murder of a police officer that outraged an entire county and reverberated for decades sprang from a chance encounter with a very unusual tombstone. Download PDF from Ancestry Magazine

THEN AND NOW: ISLAND PARK, MAYVILLE, NORTH DAKOTA

Ancestry, March-April 2009
Take two looks – one hundred years apart – at a beautiful city park in a small North Dakota college town, the latter photographed during my travels in 2008. Download PDF from Ancestry Magazine

A STITCH IN TIME

Ancestry, November-December 2008
When your ancestors leave you no heirloom, make one. Download PDF from Ancestry Magazine


WITH BOTH FEET ON THE GROUND

Ancestry, July-August 2008
There is nothing like the magic of “being there.” Unforgettable experiences unfold when you answer the call from another time and put your feet on the ground your ancestors called home. Download PDF from Ancestry Magazine

MY NAVY BLUE HAWAII

Ancestry, November-December 2007
A free trip to Hawaii has deeper meaning. A follow-up to Too Soon. Download PDF from Ancestry Magazine

EMMA’S UNMARKED REST

Ancestry, September-October 2007
How the death of a beloved firstborn baby reveals a family’s struggles and the story behind the “potter’s field.” Download PDF from Ancestry Magazine

IN SPELCHEK WE DON’T TRUST

Ancestry, November-December 2006
Love it or hate it, Spelchek is here to stay. But woe unto those whose faith is blind! Spelchek will not save you when your flying fingers add ‘double garbage’ to the new home description instead of ‘double garage,’ or when you tell the boss you ‘hate to talk to him’ rather than ’have to talk to him.’ And Spelchek, far far being a genealogist’s friend, can seen downright hostile. Read it here.

TOO SOON

Ancestry, September-October 2006
A family’s loss of a 20-year-old WWII Navy aviator resonates across six decades. The common thread to all such stories is their ability to overwhelm us with sadness. When relatives leave us too soon, a special responsibility passes to us as family historians — to tell the story and bear witness to a life that mattered perhaps all the more because of its brevity. Download PDF from Ancestry Magazine [1.9 mb]

LITTLE BOY FOUND

Ancestry, July-August 2005
The fantastic voyage of a 111-year-old tombstone ends where it began. A child’s tombstone is fished out of a river 60 years after his death and remains unclaimed for another half-century. A true-life history detective story about Ellen’s search to find the rightful home of a stone memorializing one whose life was over too soon. Read it here.